The National Glass Collectors Fair

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In Focus: 23 November 2014

Whilst updating the Preview Gallery for our 23 November 2014 fair we chose to highlight several significant pieces of glass that were offered for sale by our exhibitors at the National Glass Fair.


In Focus: 18th Century Drinking Glasses

A Pair of 18th century colour-twist drinking glasses.
A Pair of 18th century
colour-twist drinking glasses.

Here we have a very fine and rare pair of mixed colour twist drinking glass.

The glasses date from around 1770 and stand at 17.2cm tall (6 3/4 inches).

Both glasses features a bell bowl that has been finely engraved - one with a tulip and the other with running hares.

Each bowl sits on a stem that incorporates a multi-spiral air twist corkscrew, with a single blue thread.

The stems both end in a conical foot.

 

Visit the 18th Century Preview Gallery to view further examples of drinking glasses from this period.

 

 

 


19th Century Engraved Tumbler

Engraved 19th Century Tumbler

Engraved 19th Century Tumbler

This fine tumbler is engraved with a regal figure standing before the Houses of Parliament.

The glass is inscribed with the motto 'TESTA CORPO - BILL OF RIGHTS - MAGNA CHARTA' within a circular cartouche, which also features the words 'MAY OUR HAPPY CONSTITUTION IN CHURCH & STATE EVER CONTINUE UNIMPAIRED', with 'CHURCH AND KING' below.

The reverse of the glass has engraved initials linked by festoons of polished ornament patrerae and crowns. The base of the glass decorated with basal cut flutes.

The tumbler stands at 13cm in height and dates from around 1800-1828.

The pair to this tumbler is illustrated in 'The British Antiques' Dealers Association 90th Anniversary Exhibition - Rare English Tumblers 1750-1830' - Delomosne & Son Ltd March 2008.

Visit the 19th and 20th Century Preview Gallery to view further examples of decorative glass from this period.


Cameo Vase by Helen Millard

Cameo vase by Helen Millard

Cameo vase by Helen Millard

This vase is a fine example of the cameo glass produced by contemporary glass artist Helen Millard.

Cameo glass is a technique that dates back to the Roman empire and is created by carving through different coloured layers of glass to reveal a design in relief.

Cameo glass was revived in the late 19th century by pioneering glassmakers such as George Woodall. His work inspired manufacturers around the world and cameo glass was produced using a number of techniques up until WWII.

In recent years the boom in contemporary studio glass has resulted in various glass artists rediscovering and reviving the cameo technique.

Helen Millard’s work is very much in keeping with the late 19th century cameo produced by Woodall, Stevens & Williams and Thomas Webb & Sons. The illustrated vase is a typical example of her work and demonstrates how she celebrates the legacy of the 19th century masters and has made a name for herself as one of the finest cameo glass engravers in the UK

Visit the November 2014 Contemporary Glass Preview Gallery to view further examples of decorative glass by contemporary glass artists.


Leaf bowl by Venini

Leaf bowl by Venini

Leaf bowl by Venini

This 'Leaf' bowl by is regarded by many to be a masterpiece of craftsmanship by the Murano glassmakers Venini.

This particular design was created by Tyra Lundgren in 1938.

Tyra Lundgren was passionate about art and design from an early age and in 1922 she began designing tableware for the Moser factory in Karlsbach. Despite the success of her designs she decided to study sculpture in Vienna with Anton Hanak and painting in Paris.

Lundgren was deeply influenced by the artistic movement named “Valori Plastici”. Tyra's real success began when her ceramic works were presented at the Venice Biennial and the Triennial in Milan.

During the 1930s Lundgren began working with glass again and her international success captured the attention of Paolo Venini. She consequently began her collaboration with Venini in 1937 and her first
production line included a series of birds, fish and leaf bowls.

Visit the 19th and 20th Century Preview Gallery to view further examples of decorative glass from this period.