The National Glass Collectors Fair

Heading: National Glass Collectors Fair

In Focus:
13 November 2016

Whilst updating the Preview Gallery for our November 2016 National Glass Fair we chose to highlight various significant pieces of glass that were offered for sale by exhibitors on the day of the fair.


Gilded Wine Glass

18th Century Wine Glass: Front Detail
18th Century Wine Glass: Front Detail

This rare and interesting 18th century drinking glass is engraved and gilded with ship in full sail. The opposite side of the glass sports the names 'H Lommerese' and 'G I Nolet' with a crown above and the date '1782' below.

Both of the featured names are Dutch in origin, so this could possibly be a marriage glass. Nolet is in fact the name of Holland's oldest producer of Gin and although Jenever is its Dutch name, the commissioner of the glass (with some knowledge of English) may be having a little play with words. Upon contacting the producers of Nolet Gin they were unable to throw any light on the subject.

Visit the 17th & 18th Century gallery to view more examples of this type of glass from the 17th and 18th centuries.

Gilded & Engraved 18th Century Wine Glass
Gilded & Engraved 18th Century Wine Glass
18th Century Wine Glass: Inscription
18th Century Wine Glass: Inscription

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Josef Hospodka Vase

Flower Vase: Designed by Josef by Hospodka for Prachen Glasswork (c. 1967-70)
Flower Vase: Designed by Josef by Hospodka for Prachen Glasswork (c. 1967-70)


This flower vase was designed by Josef by Hospodka for Prachen Glasswork (Checkoslovakia). Josef Hospodka began work at Parchen in 1969 after a highly creative period at Chribska. He built a reputation for himself through the hot-worked 'offhand' designs he produced. Interestingly Joseph was assisted at Prachen by Frantisek Koudelka, who went on to become a notable designer in his own right.

Although Joseph was already known for his work with both coloured & transparent glass, this vase represented a departure for him: due to the combination of a mould-blown geometric form with applied & impressed motifs.

Visit the 19th & 20th Century gallery to view more examples of glassware from this period.

 


Baccarat Paperweight

Baccarat Paperweight
Baccarat Paperweight

Baccarat was one of the first French glasshouses to start making paperweights in the classic period (1845–1865). They were greatly influenced by Venetian glassmaker Pietro Bigaglia after seeing his work at the Exhibition of Austrian Industry in Vienna in 1845.

Unfortunately by the 1950s, when Baccarat decided to re-introduce paperweights into their production range, the secrets of its fine millefiori and lamp-working techniques had long been forgotten. A gradual learning process followed and by the late 1950s the company was again producing millefiori weights. The first lamp-work examples didn't appear until the late 60s.  

Over the years the millefiori canes became more and more complex with the edition sizes smaller.  However it is rare to come across a one-off design such as this example shown above. This paperweight was probably a trial for a 1996 limited edition that did not go into production.  It features a 1996 date cane, an acid-etched Baccarat insignia and is numbered 1/1.

 


Regency Decanters

Regency Decanters With Papier Mâché Double Coaster Trolleys
Regency Decanters With Papier Mâché Double Coaster Trolleys

This is a magnificent set of four full-bottle size decanters of the Regency period
(c. 1815). The shapes, with their vertical sides are known as 'nelsons' - several decanter shapes were given names of naval heroes in the Georgian period.

The decanters are cut with a broad band of prism cutting above three steps and a band band of v-grooves, which extend round to the base to form star cut bases, with central ground and polished pontils. The necks are step-cut with everted lips and the decanters are fitted with star-cut capstan stoppers.

Sets of four decanters of this date - especially all with their original stoppers - are very scarce and seldom come to the market. The combination of their quality and excellent condition adds to that scarcity, but that is not all. They also come together with a pair of papier mâché double coaster trolleys which may have been put together as an ensemble when they were originally retailed.

Under very bright photographic lighting, is is possible to see a small internal crack in one decanter. The crack is about 15mm long and does not leak. In normal domestic circumstances it would not be visible.

It has been suggested that these decanters may have been made by Perrin & Geddes of Warrington, who produced very high quality decanters for Royalty and Liverpool Corporation.

As a special promotion for the November 2016 National Glass Fair, visitors to the fair will be able to purchase these decanters at the discounted price of £4,800 (reduced from £5,200).

Date: c. 1815-20

Dimensions: 26.7cm high, including stoppers.

Visit the 19th & 20th Century gallery to view more examples of glassware from this period.